The South Asian Life & Times - SALT   
  Fall/Winter 2014          
   

 

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 Fall 2014

 

 Editor's Note

 Wildlife & Adventure
 Pench Tiger Reserve

 Baghvan Lodge

   

 Feature
 
Congress - The Way
 Forward

 Dr Shashi Tharoor

 Manish Tewari

 Art
 Rashid Rana
 A New Vision

 Environment
 Vandana Shiva
 Combating GMOs

 Lifestyle Feature
 '3 Cities, 3 Chefs'

 Chef Manish
 Mehrotra

 Chef Vivek Singh

 Chef Vikram Sunderam

 People
 Richard Rahul Verma

 Kailash Satyarthi 

 Malala Yousafzai

 Sangeeta Bhatia


 
Heritage
 UN Asia-Pacific
 Heritage Awards

 Health
 Rising Tide of Thyroid Conditions &   Diabetes

  Book Reviews
 Children of the
 Revolution

 Q & A - Feroze Dada

  Alim-ud-Din: A Straight
 Bat

 In Memoriam
 Khushwant Singh

  BKS Iyengar

  Suchitra Sen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

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Pench National Park

The tiger, we all know, is in deep trouble. Globally, there are now just 3,200 tigers left in the wild. In India they are down to around 1,700, according to a recent tiger census - from an estimated population of 40,000 a century ago - just 2% of the population 100 years ago. Four sub-species are now extinct - the Bali, Javan, Caspian, and South China. Shere Khan is teetering on the very brink of extinction. Panna and Sariska confessed, when challenged by a group of students from the Wildlife Institute of India, to the non-existence of tigers in their reserves. This was eight years ago having misled tiger-trailers for years!

Today, 38,000 square kilometres of wilderness in India is protected, across 500 parks, reserves, and sanctuaries, shielding tigers and other wildlife from poaching, and flora from deforestation, and overgrazing. Project Tiger in India has been one of the world's most passionate campaigns.

Pench is one of India's lesser known parks. A couple of hours drive from the city of Nagpur, it is situated along the southern boundary of Madhya Pradesh, bordering Maharashtra, spread over an area of 752 sq km in the lower southern reaches of the Satpura hills. Wilder and less-visited, it is perhaps the only park in Madhya Pradesh that has a walking trail complete with four observation towers - and no one seems to have used it!

 

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